Monthly Wrap-Up: August 2017

August 2017 Monthly Wrap-UpAugust means the back-to-school rush, and this year that meant taking my girl through the halls of my former junior high school, which doesn’t even seem possible, to be honest. That much time can’t have passed, can it?

It also means finishing up some summer-time cleaning out and re-arranging, which means new and fun things for my bookshelves! This past month my husband built custom wall-mounted shelves for me and hung them up in our living room. I love the way they look.

Here are the reviews you may have missed this month and a bit about each book. You’ll notice a couple titles reviewed by the amazing and wonderful Gabrielle in addition to titles I’ve reviewed. Check them out!

Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess

Solo by Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

This is the first book I’ve read by Kwame Alexander, and I must have more. I loved the lyrical, deeply moving lines of poetry and the story of this boy trying to find himself.

Bullied by J. D. Jacobs

Bullied by J. D. Jacobs

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

Bullying is a huge topic in YA, but sometimes the most compelling stories about it contain a lot of explicit content, which isn’t great for all readers. I am always looking for cleaner options for sensitive readers to turn to, and was glad to find this book.

Trashing the Planet by Stuart A. Kallen

Trashing the Planet:Examining our Global Garbage Glut by Stuart A. Kallen

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

I liked the way this book presented problems along with some exciting opportunities for solutions. The problem of too much trash can seem overwhelming, so I liked feeling empowered to make changes and the chance to be better educated about the issue.

Hedy's Journey: The True Story of a Hungarian Girl Fleeing the Holocaust by Michelle Bisson

Hedy’s Journey: The True Story of a Hungarian Girl Fleeing the Holocaust by Michelle Bisson

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

This was an unusual format for a book on my reading list as it had a lot of illustrations– which were lovely. I liked that they elevated the impact of the story. Definitely a great reminder of what some people faced during World War II.

The List by Patricia Forde

The List by Patricia Forde

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

I am a total sucker for a good dystopian story, and this is exactly what I found in this book. Loved that it’s word-focused and has a bit of romance in it, too.

Unraveling by Sara Ella

Unraveling by Sara Ella

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

I wasn’t as taken with this book as with the first in the series, but loved following the next part of the story. I gotta say, I’m mostly holding out as team Joshua.

The Waking Land by Callie Bates

The Waking Land by Callie Bates

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

If you like fantasy with engrossing culture or politics, I highly recommend this book. It’s got some sexual content, so check the notes in my review if that’s an issue for you.

Reintegration by Ashley Bogner

Reintegration by Ashley Bogner

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

After reading Gabrielle’s stellar review, I’m eager to check out Reintegration myself. If you’re a dystopian lit fan like me, this sounds like one not to miss.

 

It Looks Like This by Rafi Mittlefehldt

It Looks Like This by Rafi Mittlefehldt

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

This was a tough read for me because it made me reevaluate some of the experiences I had as a teen growing up in the kind of church where the main character, Mike, feels like such an outsider. I think that kind of reflection is ultimately healing and helpful, though. And I loved the power of Mike’s story and the raw emotion the author uses to convey it.

Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin

Wolf by Wolf (Wolf by Wolf #1) by Ryan Graudin

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

This book has been on my To-Read list for quite some time, and now that Gabrielle has had such great things to say about it, I’m even more eager. Definitely into the whole rewritten history aspects and the deep characterization.

Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor

Definitions of Indefinable Things by Whitney Taylor

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

I liked the snarky humor with which this story tackles depression and difficult teen relationships. It reminded me a little bit of a Matthew Quick novel.

A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay

A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay

Review | Amazon | Goodreads

Another really imaginative dystopian story about a female-dominated society. If you like the more literary-style dystopian tales, you need this one on your list.

What’s on your back-to-school reading list?

Are you reading anything interesting now that school has started up again? Still trying to squeeze in a few last-minute planned summer reads? Share the title and what you think of it so far in the comments below!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

About Kasey Giard

Kasey is a mother, reader and aspiring author. When she's not reading or writing, you might find her out on the water fly fishing, pretending she can keep houseplants alive, or talking with the family rescue cat.
Tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *