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Review: The Wolves of Greycoat Hall by Lucinda Gifford

The Wolves of Greycoat Hall by Lucinda Gifford

The Wolves of Greycoat Hall (The Wolves of Greycoat Hall #1)
Lucinda Gifford
Kane Miller Publishing
Published September 1, 2020

Kane Miller Website | Bookshop | Goodreads

About The Wolves of Greycoat Hall

A family of wolves leaves their mansion in Moravia, returns to their Scottish homeland and fights for their right to live among society and save the castle that has been in their family for generations from a crooked developer.

Boris Greycoat is a friendly young wolf who likes meeting people and trying new foods. His father Randall Greycoat is becoming an expert in speaking French and playing table tennis. Boris’s mother, Leonora Greycoat, likes to practise her warm, reassuring smiles. Wolves need to look reassuring if they are to flourish in society.

Excited to hear the news that wolves are to be reintroduced to Scotland, Boris Greycoat and his parents, Randall and Leonora Greycoat embark on a journey back to their ancestral lands. However, it’s more difficult for wolves to travel than one might think, and it seems that Scotland may not be prepared for sophisticated wolves like the Greycoats. A deliciously funny tale, with equally amusing illustrations, about being judged for what, rather than who you are.

My Review

What a cute book! I’ve seen a couple other reviews of this series, and thought it sounded like fun. I have a young, voracious reader who will shortly be looking for middle grade books with a lot of illustrations, and I think this series might be perfect for her.

Every few pages or so, black-and-white drawing shows the characters or significant objects in the scene, which breaks up the text nicely. The whole book is about 220 pages, so it’s longer than a chapter book, but the frequent illustrations and short chapters make this a good choice for readers transitioning from chapter books to middle grade novels.

Boris and his family are kind, well-mannered wolves preparing for a vacation in Scotland. They face some prejudice from fellow passengers on a train and in a restaurant who clearly do not expect a family of wolves to be riding or dining with them. As Boris and his family explore Scotland, they decide to buy a castle, which becomes a whole adventure in itself. There are a couple of moments where tension builds, but for the most part, this is a sweet, cozy family vacation story.

I got a kick out of the different ways each family member approaches their interactions with people and their vacation adventure. This is one I know I’ll be reading again with my daughter and recommending to other readers her age.

Content Notes

Recommended for Ages 8 to 12. It would work as a read-aloud with a younger child, maybe 6-8, as well.

Representation
Main characters are wolves who experience some prejudice when they go certain places humans aren’t expecting to see well-mannered wolves. The human characters are white.

Profanity/Crude Language Content
None.

Romance/Sexual Content
None.

Spiritual Content
None.

Violent Content
In one scene, a character trips and worries he might fall from a balcony.

Drug Content
None.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which do not cost you anything to use but help support this blog. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

35 Most-Anticipated Young Adult Books Coming Spring 2024

35 Most-Anticipated Young Adult Books Coming Spring 2024

I can’t believe how many amazing books are scheduled to come out this spring! This could be why my TBR list only gets longer. Of these 35 most-anticipated spring 2024 young adult books, four conclude a duology or series. Seven feature contemporary romance. Five are thrillers, and thirteen are fantasy. There are a few graphic novels and nonfiction titles in here, too.

I’m definitely going to be busy!

Note: This post contains affiliate links that do not cost you anything to use but help support this blog. Thanks for using them for your book shopping!

35 Most-Anticipated Young Adult Books Coming Spring 2024

The No-Girlfriend Rule by Christen Randall

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: If you like Dungeons and Dragons and heartfelt rom com, you do not want to miss this one. It’s probably my favorite F/F romance ever.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


Bad Like Us by Gabriella Lepore

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: This fast-paced, closed-circle murder mystery was a super quick read (thank you, short chapters!) and just the right touch of romance.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


Compass and Blade by Rachel Greenlaw

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: If you’re looking for a high-seas adventure with a touch of magic, this one delivers. Bonus if you like insta-love/enemies-to-lovers romance.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


Kindling by Traci Chee

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A bold, fantasy, female/enby-centered reimagining of The Seven Samurai with an unforgettable cast. I must read more books by Traci Chee.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


The Baker and the Bard by Fern Haught

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: This adorable cozy fantasy is perfect for readers making the leap from MG to YA or anyone looking for a sweet story with a dash of romance.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


Breathing Underwater by Abbey Lee Nash

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A competitive swimmer has a life-changing seizure underwater. Poignant and heartfelt.

Published March 5, 2024 | My Review


Marked Man by John Florio and Ouisie Shapiro

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Short chapters with brief statements from Serpico make this compelling book unputdownable.

Published March 19, 2024 | My Review


Where Sleeping Girls Lie by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A dark, brave story about a girl wrestling with grief and identity while searching for the parties responsible for the disappearance of her private school roommate.

Published March 19, 2024 | My Review


Otherworldly by F. T. Lukens

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A fabulous blend of fantasy and reality brimming with innocence, first love, and a town stuck in unending winter.

Published April 2, 2024 | My Review


The Misdirection of Fault Lines by Anna Gracia

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Three Asian American teen girls compete at an elite tennis tournament for very different reasons. Gracia’s debut was hilarious and emotional, so I’m excited for this one.

Published April 2, 2024 | My Review to Come


The Final Curse of Ophelia Cray by Christine Calella

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Sisters in a family crisis. One joins the Navy to escape the past. The other means to bring her home to save their future. Sounds like an incredible adventure.

Published April 9, 2024 | My Review to Come


Dragonfruit by Makiia Lucier

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Inspired by Pacific Island mythology and packed with danger, sea dragons, and a chance at redemption.

Published April 9, 2024 | My Review to Come


Three Summers: A Memoir of Sisterhood, Summer Crushes, and Growing Up on the Eve of War by Amra Sabic-El-Rayess with Laura L. Sullivan

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A girl reeling from her brother’s death finds solace in the companionship of summers spent with her cousins. Set during the years leading up to the Bosnian genocide.

Published April 9, 2024 | My Review


Calling of Light (Shamanborn #3) by Lori M. Lee

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A new kingdom promising a bright future for her people falls under threat by a powerful enemy. One only Sircha can stop. The long-awaited finale to an incredible series.

Published April 16, 2024 | My Review to Come


This Is Me Trying by Racquel Marie

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Friends estranged after a terrible loss reconnect in this novel about grief, love, and mental illness by one of my favorite authors.

Published April 16, 2024 | My Review to Come


The One That Got Away with Murder by Trish Lundy

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: An intense thriller about a girl who must solve a murder before becoming a victim herself by a debut author. I’m in!

Published April 16, 2024 | My Review to Come


Deep is the Fen by Lili Wilkinson

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Magic, secret societies, and dangerous secrets make this one book I can’t resist reading.

Published April 16, 2024 | My Review to Come


Sheine Lende (Elatsoe #2) by Darcie Little Badger

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Another mystery steeped in magic and folklore centering on Ellie’s six-great grandmother’s life. I can’t wait for this!

Published April 16, 2024 | My Review to Come


Finally Fitz by Marisa Kanter

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Fake dating and hijinks in this social media savvy, maybe friends to lovers novel from sure bet Marisa Kanter.

Published April 23, 2024 | My Review to Come


Pillow Talk by Stephanie Cooke and Mel Valentine Vargas

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: This graphic novel sounds too awesome to miss. A fierce competitor on a pillow fight federation (part roller derby, part wrestling) exploring body image, women in sports, and freshman year of college.

Published April 30, 2024 | My Review to Come


Where Was Goodbye by Janice Lynn Mather

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A girl wrestling with grief after her brother’s death by suicide may find friendship and love again. Looks poignant and hopeful.

Published April 30, 2024 | My Review to Come


Sound the Gong (Kingdom of Three #2) by Joan He

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: I devoured the first book in this epic, intriguing duology, and now I HAVE to read the conclusion.

Published April 30, 2024 | My Review to Come


Not Like Other Girls by Meredith Adamo

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: This sounds like it would appeal to fans of YOU’D BE HOME NOW or ALL THAT’S LEFT TO SAY. A search for a missing girl exposes sinister secrets.

Published April 30, 2024 | My Review to Come


The Poisons We Drink by Bethany Baptiste

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Clever storytelling, a high-stakes quest, and a girl looking for answers from the dangerous leaders of a magical network.

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review


Death’s Country by R. M. Romero

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A novel in verse by an incredible author in which two people venture into the underworld to rescue their girlfriend.

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review to Come


Better Must Come by Desmond Hall

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Two Jamaican teens’ lives intersect when one finds missing drug money, and the other’s gang will stop at nothing to retrieve it. An action-packed thriller with an international setting.

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review to Come


Burning Crowns (Twin Crowns #3) by Catherine Doyle and Katherine Webber

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Twin sisters share a crown and face grave threats to the kingdom, their magic, and themselves in the series conclusion. (Plus romance!)

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review to Come


The Ballad of Darcy and Russell by Morgan Matson

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A girl who believes in love at first sight may have found it in the boy she meets while stranded overnight at a bus station. Sounds like a sweet, whirlwind romance.

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review to Come


Karate Prom by Kyle Starks

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Described as “a loving homage to teen comedies of the ’80s as well as badly dubbed kung-fu films.” What more needs to be said? Ha!

Published May 7, 2024 | My Review to Come


Takedown by Ali Bryan

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A 16 yo girl with a promising wrestling career risks everything by cage-fighting to raise money for medical treatment for her father.

Published May 11, 2024 | My Review to Come


A Crane Among Wolves by June Hur

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A girl desperate to save her sister. A prince desperate to dethrone a tyrant king. Based on a true story from 16th century Korean history.

Published May 14, 2024 | My Review to Come


The Worst Perfect Moment by Shivaun Piozza

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: An angel accompanies a dead girl through memories of her past to find her life’s perfect moment. This promises humor and heartbreak– two of my favorite things in a book.

Published May 14, 2024 | My Review to Come


Shooting for Stars by Christine Webb

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: A grieving girl dreams of a NASA internship to finish her mom’s research. An unexpected friendship and romance may complicate her plans. Sounds like a sweet story.

Published May 21, 2024 | My Review to Come


Another First Chance by Robbie Couch

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: Pitched as THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END meets YOU’VE REACHED SAM, so I can’t miss this one!

Published May 28, 2024 | My Review to Come


Don’t Be a Drag by Skye Quinlan

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

What You Need to Know: I can’t say it better than this: Two rival drag kings competing for a crown might just win each other’s hearts. (From the back cover.)

Published May 28, 2024 | My Review to Come


What are your most-anticipated spring 2024 young adult books?

Are there any upcoming YA titles you’re looking forward to? Have you read any of the ones on my list? Let me know in the comments!

If you’ve read any great YA books that came out this spring but didn’t make it onto my list, let me know!

Review: Three Summers by Amra Sabic-El-Rayess with Laura L. Sullivan

Three Summers: A Memoir of Sisterhood, Summer Crushes, and Growing Up on the Eve of War
Amra Sabic-El-Rayess with Laura L. Sullivan
Farrar, Straus, & Giroux
Published April 9, 2024

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

About Three Summers

An epic middle-grade memoir about sisterhood and coming-of-age in the three years leading up to the Bosnian Genocide.

Three Summers is the story of five young cousins who grow closer than sisters as ethnic tensions escalate over three summers in 1980s Bosnia. They navigate the joys and pitfalls of adolescence on their family’s little island in the middle of the Una River. When finally confronted with the harsh truths of the adult world around them, their bond gives them the resilience to discover and hold fast to their true selves.

Written with incredible warmth and tenderness, Amra Sabic-El-Rayess takes readers on a journey that will break their hearts and put them back together again.

My Review

This memoir is broken into three sections, one for each of the summers Amra spends with her cousins. Before that first summer, her family experiences a terrible loss, and Amra sinks into a dark depression. As she gets to know her cousins, she begins to have hope again, confidence in herself, and the courage to form friendships with others.

Her love for her family is so clear in the pages of the book. It celebrates familial bonds, especially those between a child and their parents, and the bonds between siblings and cousins.

This is the first book I’ve ever read about the Bosnian Genocide, though it isn’t the author’s first memoir about that time. After reading this book, I ordered a copy of her YA memoir, THE CAT I NEVER NAMED, so hopefully I’ll be ready to share my review of that book soon, too.

Technically, this book focuses on the years leading up to the genocide, in which the government becomes more and more hostile, one slow step at a time. I’m not gonna lie; it is harrowing to read a story like this and see parallels in some of the dehumanizing rhetoric certain political leaders are using right now.

Those comments make stories like this critically important because we need to remember that genocide doesn’t begin with the targeted deaths of a group of people. It begins with the systematic dehumanization of them.

I’m so glad Sabic-El-Rayess continues to write about her experiences in a way that kids can read about. The scenes in this book stay focused on Amra’s experience as a child, looking through her eyes. This is an important book, especially now. I hope that many people will discover and read it.

Content Notes

Recommended for Ages 8 to 12.

Representation
Amra and her family are Muslim. Amra’s older brother has Marfan syndrome.

Profanity/Crude Language Content
None.

Romance/Sexual Content
Kissing between boy and girl.

Spiritual Content
References to different faith practices of different groups around Amra.

Violent Content
Death of a sibling on scene. References to Islamaphobia. References to torture and execution.

Drug Content
One teen character smokes cigarettes.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which do not cost you anything to use but help support this blog. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

Review: Disfigured: On Fairytales, Disability, and Making Space by Amanda Leduc

Disfigured: On Fairytales, Disability, and Making Space
Amanda Leduc
Coach House Books
Published March 3, 2020

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

About Disfigured

In fairy tales, happy endings are the norm—as long as you’re beautiful and walk on two legs. After all, the ogre never gets the princess. And since fairy tales are the foundational myths of our culture, how can a girl with a disability ever think she’ll have a happy ending?

By examining the ways that fairy tales have shaped our expectations of disability, DISFIGURED will point the way toward a new world where disability is no longer a punishment or impediment but operates, instead, as a way of centering a protagonist and helping them to cement their own place in a story, and from there, the world. Through the book, Leduc ruminates on the connections we make between fairy tale archetypes—the beautiful princess, the glass slipper, the maiden with long hair lost in the tower—and tries to make sense of them through a twenty-first-century disablist lens.

From examinations of disability in tales from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen through to modern interpretations ranging from Disney to Angela Carter, and the fight for disabled representation in today’s media, Leduc connects the fight for disability justice to the growth of modern, magical stories, and argues for increased awareness and acceptance of that which is other—helping us to see and celebrate the magic inherent in different bodies.

My Review

I heard about this book years ago from booktuber Jesse on YouTube, who read and recommended it. Sadly, it took me a long time to actually read the book myself, but I finally have! And I’m so glad I did.

This book explores fairytales through the lens of what it’s like to read them as a person with disabilities. The author not only shares her own experience as a girl with cerebral palsy, but she also quotes and shares stories of other writers and activists with disabilities as they share their own experiences as well.

One of the things I found the most impactful about DISFIGURED was seeing different fairytale characters and stories from this perspective. There were many things I hadn’t considered or was unaware of. It helped to break things down into tropes and themes and look at what those ideas say about the value or morality of those characters and through the characters the people represented.

For example, the author talks about how often in fairytales, characters with disabilities fall into two categories. Either they are noble characters whose disabilities become reversed because they were pure of heart or brave or noble. Or the disability is supposed to be evidence of an internal evil that remains a static part of the character’s nature.

There’s also some commentary about the differences in the roles of women versus men in fairytales, too. I enjoyed that a lot.

All in all, DISFIGURED is a really thoughtful book that explores familiar fairytales, where they came from, and what they teach us about who we are and what society should be. And asks whether we agree with those lessons and, if not, what we will do about it.

Content Notes

Recommended for Ages 14 up.

Representation
The author has Cerebral Palsy. She quotes other disabled writers and activists.

Profanity/Crude Language Content
Very infrequent extreme profanity.

Romance/Sexual Content
References to fairytale romance/weddings. Leduc recounts an early version of what became the Sleeping Beauty fairytale in which a maiden pricks her finger on a flax seed and falls into a magical sleep. A traveling king sees her and is so overcome with lust that he rapes her (not described in any detail). The author points out that the story never addresses the king’s behavior as problematic, wrong, or illegal.

The author references an essay written by a man with disabilities who openly talks about hiring sex workers to meet his personal needs. (No details beyond this.)

Spiritual Content
Discusses the origins of the fairy godmother/fairies in fairytales. Examines the Christian (Calvinist, in the case of the Grimm Brothers) roots or edits to many fairytales in subsequent editions. Mentions of magic in stories.

In one tale, the devil tricks a man into promising his daughter to him. The girl thwarts the bargain several times.

Violent Content
References to some gory elements of especially early fairytales. Cinderella’s stepsisters mutilate their feet to fit into her shoe. The evil queen in Snow White is forced to dance in red-hot metal shoes until she dies at the tale’s end. See romantic content.

The author also discusses the changeling myths and how people would leave their babies or young children in the snow to die of exposure if they believed the baby was a changeling. She briefly tells a story about a man who burned his wife to death. He claimed she’d been replaced by a changeling after an illness.

Drug Content
Mentions of magical potions or poisoned fruit.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which do not cost you anything but help support this blog.

Favorite Series: The Deadlands Series by Skye Melki-Wegner

The Deadlands Series by Skye Melki-Wegner

If you’re a returning visitor, chances are, you’ve heard me talk about The Deadlands series already. As a kid who grew up watching The Land Before Time (and too many of its sequels), these books made me remember why I loved those dinosaur movies. If you’d asked me whether I needed more dinosaur middle grade books in my life, I probably would have looked at you sideways, yet, as soon as I read the opening pages of the first book, I was hopelessly hooked. I knew it would be one of the few series I follow from beginning to end.

Though I follow young adult literature more closely than middle grade, I still expected to see more buzz about The Deadlands than I actually did. Maybe I don’t travel in the right MG circles, or maybe it’s just stayed very much under the radar, but I think these books are well worth checking out. The pacing moves pretty quickly. The characters are well-developed, but their personal stories don’t distract from the overall plot. They feel fresh and new to me in a way that I didn’t even know I needed.

At any rate, I had an excellent time reading them, so when the publisher offered a set of finished copies in exchange for posting about the series, that was a no-brainer for me. I don’t usually do promo posts, but this is a comfortable exception, since it really gives me an excuse to talk about a series I wanted to create more chances to recommend. Also, it was really fun to do a bookish photo shoot outside in my yard. Ha!

Note: This post contains affiliate links which do not cost you anything to use. I received free finished copies of the books in this series from the publisher to photograph for my post.

Books in the Deadlands Series by Skye Melki-Wegner

The Deadlands: Hunted (The Deadlands #1) by Skye Melki-Wegner

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

My thoughts: I love the blend of familiar and unknown dinosaurs in this book. Eleri’s love for stories and misfit feelings hooked me immediately. Fabulous series opener.

Published April 4, 2023 | My Review


The Deadlands: Trapped (The Deadlands #2) by Skye Melki-Wegner

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

My thoughts: Book one may have hooked me, but this book made me fall in love. What a great cast of unforgettable characters, all with distinct voices and personalities. This is perfect for young animal lovers.

Published October 3, 2023 | My Review


The Deadlands: Survival (The Deadlands #3) by Skye Melki-Wegner

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

My thoughts: I could not wait to read this action-packed conclusion to the series. I followed Eleri and his friends to the very last page. This book will very likely be on my top ten for the year.

Published April 2, 2024 | My Review


About Skye Melki-Wegner

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Website

Skye Melki-Wegner started writing as soon as she could hold a pen. She was immediately drawn to fantasy — and soon her notebooks overflowed with dragons, pixies, wizards and various magical shenanigans. After graduating with an honours degree in law, she decided to pursue her passion and prioritised writing fantasy books over pursuing a legal career.

Skye’s YA fantasy novels include the Chasing the Valley trilogy, The Hush and the Agent Nomad books. Her first Middle Grade trilogy, The Deadlands, will be published in 2023.

Are You Familiar with The Deadlands Series?

Have you heard of this series before? Do you recall seeing other bloggers, book influencers, or educators talking about it? If you remember where you saw the books, let me know! I would love to expand the middle grade-centered blogs or bookish content that I follow.

If you’re familiar with the series, tell me who your favorite character in the comments. For me, it’s easily Eleri, the oryctodromeus. I love that he’s a storyteller, and the he uses stories to lead and problem-solve. Sorielle, the ankylosaur is my second-favorite.

Review: Trouble at the Tangerine by Gillian McDunn

Trouble at the Tangerine
Gillian McDunn
Bloomsbury
Published April 2, 2024

Amazon | Bookshop | Goodreads

About Trouble at the Tangerine

Award-winning author Gillian McDunn pens a delightfully quirky mystery that examines the meaning of home, perfect for fans of The Vanderbeekers series.

Simon’s family is always on the move. Every few months, they load up their van, “Vincent Van Go,” and set off for a new adventure. According to his dad, you can’t live an extraordinary life by staying in one place. But all Simon wants is to settle down, so he’s hatched a to make their latest apartment in the Tangerine Pines building his forever home.

When a priceless necklace is stolen, clues indicate the thief might actually be another neighbor. Simon worries he’ll have to move again if the thief isn’t caught. He usually doesn’t go looking for trouble, but if retrieving the necklace means establishing home, Simon is willing to risk it. With the help of his neighbor Amaya, pet-sitter, plant-waterer, and podcaster extraordinaire, Simon is determined to crack the case and finally put down roots.

My Review

I’ve read all the books Gillian McDunn has published so far, so I knew when I saw this one, that I had to read it. Her books are so great!

This one is a little different than the others. Maybe the one it’s most like is HONESTLY ELLIOT. I think TROUBLE AT THE TANGERINE reads a little bit younger than her other books, but I’m second-guessing that now. I’m not sure. That was my sense as I read the book, but I could be wrong.

TROUBLE also follows a mystery, which is something a little different. It’s also a story about making friends and being the new kid, so maybe it’s really half mystery, half new kid making friends. I liked the balance between those two things, and it made the mystery seem less intense, which I think is good.

I thought the story definitely had some very lighthearted, very upbeat Rear Window vibes. It’s not scary or tense at all like that movie, but it’s about a kid in an apartment building with a broken leg in the summer solving a mystery and observing his neighbors. So, there are a few similarities. (There are no hatboxes or scary things buried outside, though.)

On the whole, I think this will be a really fun summer read. It’s a perfect vacation or beach book or great for reading on a lazy, hot day.

Content Notes

Recommended for Ages 8 to 12.

Representation
List.

Profanity/Crude Language Content
List.

Romance/Sexual Content
List.

Spiritual Content
List.

Violent Content
List.

Drug Content
List.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which do not cost you anything to use but help support this blog. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

Marvelous Middle-Grade Mondays

I’m sharing this post as a part of a weekly round-up of middle-grade posts called Marvelous Middle-Grade Mondays. Check out other blogs posting about middle-grade books today on Marvelous Middle-Grade Mondays at Always in the Middle with Greg Pattridge.